International Humanity

A Blog Started to Record my thoughts on International News events

Japanese Brazil Coin and its Hidden Message

Posted by alexfrancis on April 19, 2007

500-yen-commemorative-coin.jpg

This 500 yen commemorative coin will be issued next year to mark the 100th anniversary of the start of Japanese emigration to Brazil.

The coin will be made out of the same materials as a normal 500 yen coin, but it will depict a Japanese family of three emigrants on one side and a design of cherry blossoms and coffee beans on the reverse. These images were most likely chosen for their representative meanings. Cherry blossoms are a symbol of Japanese culture because they represent a life that is very beautiful yet ephemeral. On the other hand, coffee beans represent the Brazilian economy, rather than Brazilian people themselves.

I propose that Japan is minting this new coin in order to strengthen its image as a friendly, democratic, liberal trading country that is looking to expand its trade industry. In reality, Japan’s population is decreasing, and Japan is quickly becoming an aging society. For this reason, in the future Japan will have an insufficient work force to support an economy that is strained by retirement funds and benefits of the elderly such as medical care.

This means that Japan will have to draw upon immigrants to support its economy. A lot of these immigrants are expected to come from Latin and South American countries. After all, while the Global North is decreasing in population, the Global South is continuing to put out large amounts of babies. This demographic transition will result in the movement of people to where the best jobs are. In effect, this will be a brain drain from Latin and South American countries to Japan where there are more jobs available for people. I think Japan will print this Brazil coin in order to give a good image of friendly relations to ensure its own economic security in the future.

source: http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/nb20070418a5.html

Follow Link for Longer Commentary: http://pols51.wordpress.com/2007/04/24/the-international-politics-of-numismatics/

5 Responses to “Japanese Brazil Coin and its Hidden Message”

  1. […] of Numismatics Of course, Japan is trying to polish its image.  Is that so wrong? Japanese Brazil Coin and its Hidden Message « International Humanity This 500 yen commemorative coin will be issued next year to mark the 100th anniversary of the […]

  2. First of all, I had to look up Numismatics in the dictionary – nice word. The science of coins and medals. I’m not saying that there is anything wrong with Japan trying to boost its image. Rather, I think that this is a strategic move by Japan to ensure its economic vitality. After all, Japan will need workers to support its economy in the future; Brazil might be a good place to draw from. Therefore, Japan has issued a coin that will flatter the Brazilians.

  3. bklunk said

    AF, You should check out the commentary on IRregular Blogging. The students at St. Thomas seemed to like the word Numismatics too.

  4. Talk about lengthy commentary! The students at St. Thomas seem to know quite a bit about Japanese politics and culture. Good comments. I think they’re mostly right that the issuing of one coin is not going to greatly alter Japan’s immigration policy. In addition, Japan’s culture will have to be transformed from within to be more accepting towards outsiders, as the students say. Nevertheless, the longest journeys begin with a single step.

  5. […] I Turn « IRregular Blogging on U.S. Commitment to Extended Deterrence for Japanalexfrancis on Japanese Brazil Coin and its Hidden Messagebklunk on Japanese Brazil Coin and its Hidden Messagealexfrancis on Japanese Brazil Coin and its […]

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